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Autor Tema: Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.  (Leído 37372 veces)

Desconectado Mike

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #80 en: Agosto 03, 2017, 06:01:17 pm »
"Stab" conveys the idea of something like a knife and also the accompanying idea of violence. "Stick" (something in) is more general; it can mean just "insert" or also something pointed too like "stab". I got this quote from linguee.com for the "insert" meaning:
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So as soon as Al-Qaeda or some other fundamentalist group full of nutters can get their hands on a bit of enriched-uranium, put together an improvised
nuclear bomb and stick it in a suitcase, there would be a problem.
>:(

"Stick" is a good word to include into your vocabulary!

Mike 


Desconectado Raquel

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #81 en: Agosto 04, 2017, 10:54:54 pm »
"Stab" conveys the idea of something like a knife and also the accompanying idea of violence. "Stick" (something in) is more general; it can mean just "insert" or also something pointed too like "stab".
  Great!! That's exactly the idea I had in my mind. I did know "stick" already, but didn't know I could use it for a metaphorical "clavar", when you're not literally inserting any of your bones into someone else's "insert body part here".

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"Stick" is a good word to include into your vocabulary!
It is; thank you!! It's one of those words I understand but don't use much; I'll have to do something about that, except to talk about sticker-like sticking or "sticking with something until getting the desired result".

Desconectado Mike

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Do you have a clothes horse?
« Respuesta #82 en: Agosto 12, 2017, 10:01:30 am »
It's funny how words surge from one's distant past. As an "ex-pat" from the UK over 25 years standing (though I never liked nor quite agreed with that term "ex-pat"), words come up that one hasn't used since living in the UK. We were on holiday and had rented an apartment and on the balcony there was one of those wire contraptions for hanging out your clothes. A CLOTHES HORSE is its name. Why a "horse"? asked my daughter. Well, it has a head, a tail and four legs, I answered - just guessing. (See pic below). Interestingly, if you look on Google images, all variations of these wire clothes driers are also called "clothes horses".

Mike  ;D

Desconectado Mami2014

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #83 en: Agosto 29, 2017, 06:23:18 pm »
Gracias Mike por tu ayuda, espero que el verano haya ido bien.

Me han sido útiles especialmente los útimos post pues yo al igual que Raquel utilizaba "stab" cuando quería ordenarle a mi hijo que pinchara con el tenedor más comida (gracias Raquel por plantear tus dudas que me parece nos aparecen a todos en algún momento). Incluyo yo también a partir de ahora una mención especial para "stick"  ;D. Por cierto, después de más de año y medio sigo sin consegir que mi niño de tres años y medio se suelte a decirme en inglés algo más que frases cortas como I'm a kitten y poco más, a ver si con el siguiente empiezo desde antes de nacer y lo consigo  ::)

Desconectado Mike

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #84 en: Agosto 31, 2017, 09:24:35 am »
"...they gathered for the feast,
They stab it with their steely knives,
but they just can't kill the beast."
(From Hotel California, The Eagles)

Yes, "stab" often has more aggressive connotations than "stick in".  :D

Good to hear from you again, Mami2014! From my own experience with Carmen, there was a huge improvement in English language output at about 5 years of age. Perhaps you shouldn't compare with Raquel's daughter's results. Laura has more developed English than Spanish. If English is your daughter's L1b (second mother tongue), you'll notice vast improvements as she matures. From about 5 years of age, English skills really begin to take off. Be patient but consistent and you will reap your rewards!

Mike (father of 8 year old bilingual)

Desconectado Raquel

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #85 en: Septiembre 04, 2017, 02:51:09 pm »
Carmen isn't the only one who thinks "clothes horse" is a funny term, Mike; I've wondered the same thing myself: why "horse"?

So I can't tell my children to stab their food anymore? Do I have to say "stick your fork in...[that piece of chicken/whatever]?"

Mike, I've been thinking of you every time I use sticking since you mentioned this verb: something sticks out, I'm stuck, stick with it, and many more I can't think of right now, but what a verb!! We use it all the time!

Mami2014, as Mike said, my daughter's first language is English at the moment, which is why I worry so much about it not being good enough for her age. If it was her second language, it would be a different story. Just stick with English (hey, stick again!) and what you're doing, and give it time. You'll see how your son's English improves. But, if you can start from day 1 with your 2nd child, then do it! The sooner, the better ;)

Desconectado Mike

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The use of verb "stick" and "a wild goose chase"
« Respuesta #86 en: Septiembre 09, 2017, 09:37:06 am »
Of course, the verb "stick" as in "stick your fork in" is rather colloquial and even humorous at times. You can just say "push/put your fork in" if you want to sound more formal and serious with your daughter and the latter might be preferred in more formal English in general with adults.

Helping tourist with parking payment machine:
"You put your money in that slot there" (Not: "Stick it in there!"  ;D)

Yesterday, we went on a "wild goose chase". My daughter had lost a doll (miniature one at that) she was tearful about finding. Good 'ol Daddy took pity and helped her sift through all her toys, which took ages, but we found nothing. When my wife came home, she told us straight away that Carmen had given that doll to the school toy market over a year ago. That's a "wild goose chase"!

We often say in English "I hope this isn't going to be a wild goose chase!". "You're not leading me on a wild goose chase, are you?". Often when trying to find somewhere when your all out driving in the car and you're not lucky, we used to say "another wild goose chase!". Well, with GPS these days perhaps that doesn't happen anymore...

Mike
« Última modificación: Septiembre 09, 2017, 09:53:21 am por Mike »

Desconectado Raquel

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Re:The use of verb "stick" and "a wild goose chase"
« Respuesta #87 en: Septiembre 13, 2017, 02:33:45 pm »
(Not: "Stick it in there!"  ;D)
LOL!!

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Good 'ol Daddy took pity and helped her sift through all her toys, which took ages, but we found nothing. When my wife came home, she told us straight away that Carmen had given that doll to the school toy market over a year ago.
Oh, no!!

Today I was thinking to myself: "when the bus... takes off?" Planes do take off, but what about buses? What is it called when they start moving?

Speaking of geese, the "wild goose chase" made me think of the expression "silly goose", which, BTW, my daughter loves. We all learned it when watching a Paw Patrol episode. Thank you again, TV!

Desconectado Mike

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #88 en: Septiembre 17, 2017, 04:23:49 pm »
Mmm. Wheeled vehicles!

If you're in a bus or train, I think you could say, "we're off!", "we're leaving!". When observing vehicles, we often say, "the bus pulled away" (= started moving).

Yes, it's important to have paliative expressions for concepts like "stupid" and "idiot" etc. We don't want our children using those words. In our family we often say "you silly sausage!"  :D

Mike

Desconectado Raquel

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #89 en: Septiembre 19, 2017, 02:01:58 pm »
Thanks for "pulling away"; that's what I was after. People say that phrasal verbs are hard, but I'd love to have a list with Spanish verbs and the equivalent phrasal verb, because I know my English is lacking there.

Silly sausage, how cute! All the native speakers who came home used "silly". It still sounds, to me, stronger than it really is, so I'm trying to remember it's okay for Laura to call us silly, because it isn't an insult. Silly goose or silly sausage sounds better to me, more playful.


 

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