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Autor Tema: Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.  (Leído 32141 veces)

Desconectado Mike

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #80 en: Agosto 03, 2017, 06:01:17 pm »
"Stab" conveys the idea of something like a knife and also the accompanying idea of violence. "Stick" (something in) is more general; it can mean just "insert" or also something pointed too like "stab". I got this quote from linguee.com for the "insert" meaning:
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So as soon as Al-Qaeda or some other fundamentalist group full of nutters can get their hands on a bit of enriched-uranium, put together an improvised
nuclear bomb and stick it in a suitcase, there would be a problem.
>:(

"Stick" is a good word to include into your vocabulary!

Mike 


Desconectado Raquel

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Re:Glosario de expresiones en inglés comunes para educar desde los 0 años.
« Respuesta #81 en: Agosto 04, 2017, 10:54:54 pm »
"Stab" conveys the idea of something like a knife and also the accompanying idea of violence. "Stick" (something in) is more general; it can mean just "insert" or also something pointed too like "stab".
  Great!! That's exactly the idea I had in my mind. I did know "stick" already, but didn't know I could use it for a metaphorical "clavar", when you're not literally inserting any of your bones into someone else's "insert body part here".

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"Stick" is a good word to include into your vocabulary!
It is; thank you!! It's one of those words I understand but don't use much; I'll have to do something about that, except to talk about sticker-like sticking or "sticking with something until getting the desired result".

Desconectado Mike

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Do you have a clothes horse?
« Respuesta #82 en: Agosto 12, 2017, 10:01:30 am »
It's funny how words surge from one's distant past. As an "ex-pat" from the UK over 25 years standing (though I never liked nor quite agreed with that term "ex-pat"), words come up that one hasn't used since living in the UK. We were on holiday and had rented an apartment and on the balcony there was one of those wire contraptions for hanging out your clothes. A CLOTHES HORSE is its name. Why a "horse"? asked my daughter. Well, it has a head, a tail and four legs, I answered - just guessing. (See pic below). Interestingly, if you look on Google images, all variations of these wire clothes driers are also called "clothes horses".

Mike  ;D


 

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